Is it really art? Getty Images bans AI-generated works

Getty Images, one of the largest online image banks in the world, will ban images generated by artificial intelligence. The site indeed fears copyright violations.

Getty Images director Craig Peters communicated the ban to tech site The Verge. Getty Images is a vast repository of press photos, archival images and digital artwork used by media organizations around the world. The company now prohibits the uploading of images generated by artificial intelligence. These are images produced by AIs such as Dall-E and Stable Diffusion.

The problem with these images, according to Peters, is that it is not clear what they are based on and who owns the copyright. To protect customers against possible lawsuits, these images will simply be prohibited. There will be a procedure for reviewing the images in question, and users will also be able to report images, which they suspect were computer generated.

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AI-created images are busy taking hold, now that there are several algorithms that do a pretty good job of it. AIs like Dall-E and Stable Fusion allow users to generate images through text commands. They can thus achieve exciting things, as we have seen at the recent Data News Awards.

The images generated by the AI, however, are also controversial. The algorithm has indeed been exercised on existing photo banks and artistic works. In doing so, it is not always clear whether images protected by copyright have not ended up in this kind of bank. The (US) law is furthermore still far from clear as to whether when creating images of this kind, it is the algorithm or the user initiating the textual commands would be allocated the copyright. It is precisely for this question of rights that Getty Images is now trying to take the lead with its banning of images, in particular because the copyright is paid to their custodians. Shutterstock, Getty Images’ main competitor, currently still allows AI images.

Is it art?

In addition, there is also the whole issue of what it means to create this type of image, which affects the art world in the broadest sense. At the beginning of September, a certain Jason Allen won an art competition in the American state of Colorado with a work he had generated using AI. This caused an influx of reactions, including ‘death of the artist’ criticism, but also from human artists fearing for their future.

All of this means that it’s not just commercial sites like Getty, but also various online artist communities that are campaigning for a ban on AI-generated images. The site Newgrounds, for example, introduced this kind of ban last week, because ‘we want to continue to focus on art created by man and we do not want the Art Portal to be overwhelmed by works computer generated.

Getty Images director Craig Peters communicated the ban to tech site The Verge. Getty Images is a vast repository of press photos, archival images and digital artwork used by media organizations around the world. The company now prohibits the uploading of images generated by artificial intelligence. These are images made by AIs like Dall-E and Stable Diffusion. The problem with these images, according to Peters, is that it is unclear what they are based on and who owns the copyright. To protect customers against possible lawsuits, these images will simply be prohibited. There will be a procedure for reviewing the images in question, and users will also be able to report images, which they suspect were computer generated. AI created images are busy taking hold, now that There are several algorithms that do a pretty good job of this. AIs like Dall-E and Stable Fusion allow users to generate images through text commands. They can do exciting things this way, as seen at the recent Data News Awards. However, AI-generated images are also controversial. The algorithm has indeed been exercised on existing photo banks and artistic works. In doing so, it is not always clear whether images protected by copyright have not ended up in this kind of bank. The (US) law is furthermore still far from clear as to whether when creating images of this kind, it is the algorithm or the user initiating the textual commands would be allocated the copyright. It is precisely for this question of rights that Getty Images is now trying to take the lead with its banning of images, in particular because the copyright is paid to their custodians. Shutterstock, the main competitor of Getty Images, currently still authorizes AI images. In addition, there is also the whole problem of what it means to create this type of image, which affects the art world. in the broadest sense. At the beginning of September, a certain Jason Allen won an artistic competition in the American state of Colorado with a work that he had generated using AI. This provoked an influx of reactions, including ‘death of the artist’ criticism, but also from human artists fearing for their future. All of this means that it’s not just commercial sites like Getty , but also various communities of online artists who are campaigning for a ban on images generated by artificial intelligence. The site Newgrounds, for example, introduced this kind of ban last week, because ‘we want to continue to focus on art created by man and we do not want the Art Portal to be overwhelmed by works computer generated.

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Is it really art? Getty Images bans AI-generated works


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